Say Goodbye to “tinderbits” in its old form – Thanks E.U. GDPR :(

Some sort of early Warning – this blog “tinderbits” needs to be modified to be “legal” again due to the new E.U. Directive on 25th May 2018 GDPR (General Data Protection Regulation), so this would mean it’s going to loose the comment / email contact / youtube-embedding / bandcamp-embedding / soundcloud-embedding feature along other Word-Press related features in the background (statistics et all) … this new E.U. laws would make this blog unusuable in it’s current form, so it will probably just be “closed” or minimalized/redesigned around mid of may 2018.
 
Other parts of the mainpage tindersticks.de need minor tweaks only (removing all IP-related links (youtube, facebook & twitter & others that store data in the background & would need a written contract with google, fb, twitter and other companies who store users IPs through their program APIs et al. to be legal in the new E.U. GDPR rules – This is too much effort in the end !).
 
So say Goodbye to “tinderbits” sub-blog in its old form :(

Progress-Updates:

  • REMOVED ALL SHARE-LINKS Features / PLUGINS  (incl. Facebook, Twitter et al.)  to share Content from this Blog
  • Permanently DELETED ALL USER COMMENTS and related Data with these Comments
  • Added SSL- Encryption
  • Disabled Comments Function

Just Imagine Tindersticks & Jeff Buckley

Imagine this bill for a gig:
Jeff Buckley and Tindersticks

… this is not a dream, they really played together on one stage in 24. September 1994 . Tindersticks closing after Jeff Buckley in a short 7-song showcase at the Supper Club in NYC

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/09/23/arts/sounds-around-town-329304.html

“Jeff Buckley, Supper Club, 240 West 47th Street, Manhattan, (212) 249-8870. Jeff Buckley’s eerie, liquid, androgynous voice can’t help reminding people of his father, Tim Buckley. But he uses it to personalize his own emotionally volatile songs, which drift from pained delicacy to hard rock on the verge of Led Zeppelin. In a CMJ showcase, he shares a bill with Tindersticks, whose understated songs can take on an edge of dissonance.

The setlist was: Patchwork – Her – Tiny Tears – A Night In – Talk To Me – Drunk Tank – Mistakes (see also tinderrecordings for a bootleg)

The review of that evening:

http://www.nytimes.com/1994/09/26/arts/pop-review-love-songs-reflecting-maturity.html

Tindersticks, whose members wore jackets and ties, were more conventional rock romantics, somewhere between Bryan Ferry and the folk-rock side of the American Music Club. Following Mr. Buckley, they sounded overly methodical.”