Say Goodbye to the City (A6LY version)

 

 

update:

some comments why they choose this tracklisting … hmmm :

 

“1. Friday Night (2002) is a maverick song, looking for a home. The seeds of this song were sown in response to Claire Denis’s Vendredi Soir before the band pulled out of making the soundtrack for the film. A stripped to the bone version appeared on my first solo album “Lucky dog recordings”. It was then picked up by the band in 2011 for the Claire Denis soundtrack tour and finally became what it was always looking to be.

2. Marseilles Sunshine (2003) was written for the band just before it imploded. This song has been dreaming of this version for 10 years.

3. She’s gone (1994) See No 8.

4. Dying slowly (2001) was written, in some way, as a response to Kurt Cobain’s death. In my own small way I felt divorced from our audience; both needing to and hating engaging with them. Even though I felt that ‘Dying slowly’ had a huge element of defiance and even victory in its essence, our band was feeling pretty resigned and the original became a pretty resigned recording.

5. If you are looking for a way out (1999) is our adopted song. I am still surprised that as I stood at the side of the school disco waiting for Nag nag nag to be played, I was listening more than I gave myself credit for. I never imagined that this song would stay with me for the rest of my life. We had one attempt at it on our album ‘Simple Pleasure’ – We were trying so hard to be loose.

6. Say goodbye to the city (2003) I am so thankful now to hold this version of a song that is so close to how it was originally conceived. I thought it had gone forever, and every time I heard it I would hang my head.

7. Sleepy song (1994) See No 8

8. A night in (1994) is a song from our second album. After making our first album something happened, my writing took a huge leap. A few months earlier I could not imagine trying to write a song like ‘A night in’. Unfortunately my singing and playing did not catch up until much later. These are songs that have proved to me to need a tenderness and understanding that I was unable to give them as a younger man on a first meeting, they have grown, their sentiments have grown, they talk about so many of the experience I have had since then.

9. I know that Loving (1999) is another song from ‘Simple pleasure’. A breakthrough song that we didn’t fully understand at the time. I remember trying so hard, spending hours singing this song in the studio. I felt there was a glass ceiling above me that I just couldn’t break through.

10. What are you fighting for? (2006) is a song looking to belong somewhere. This song was supposed to close ‘The Hungry saw’, it just never found itself in time for that moment.

stuart A. staples 2013”

source: http://www.tindersticks.co.uk/across-six-leap-years/

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New Album Release Date (14.10.2013) & Video Teaser of Across Six Leap Years

teaser for A6LY: 

A6LY teaser
“We are proud to announce the release of our 10th studio album, ‘across six leap years’, on 14 October 2013. Recorded at Studio 2, Abbey Road between 6-9 April 2013, ‘across six leap years’ features 10 new versions of songs from throughout our history.

‘Recording these songs again was not so much about righting past mistakes or inadequacies, but more about the power of now. Something that’s been growing since the film shows, something that made us recognise how we feel now, and connecting that to our past feel important.
Walking up to Abbey Road, it could easily have overcome us. But it had nothing to do with its past. We weren’t there to take photos on the crossing. I didn’t think about playing the Lady Madonna piano. I’d like to say it was just another studio, but sadly, that’s not true anymore. It’s one of the only studios of its kind left. And it wasn’t about our past either. These songs feel like cover versions. Someone else’s music we feel we had something new to bring to. Abbey Road could have been a big slap on the back. Or a big punch in the face. But it felt natural. It’s where we should be. It’s important that we got here and to give ourselves some credit. It’s also important to give these songs a new life.
And so much more fun than a greatest hits album. 21 years of tindersticks. This isn’t a selected highlights. It just shows how far we’ve come.’
David Boulter 2013”

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A lengthy video interview with Stuart about a lot of things

a video-interview for http://www.FaceCulture.com

from the video descriptions:

” http://www.FaceCulture.com

Video interview with singer, guitarist Stuart Staples of the British pop band Tindersticks. FaceCulture spoke to him about the new album The Something Rain, Asphalt Ribbons, achieving ideas, transition, losing the spark within a band, taking a break, doubts about musical desire, continuing the band, first album after the break, group effort, influences on the making of a record, personal touch, self recording, selecting the songs for the record, Chocolate, My Sister, leaving Nottingham, moving to London, Medicine, writing and not writing on an acoustic guitar. Goodbye Joe, inspiration, learning from mistakes, song factory, the album title.
(10/01/2012)”

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Great Article from The Quietus about the new album, old official videos & albums in retrospect

The latest Quietus article features a great interview with Stuart & David – esp. the comments on their old official videos & albums in retrospect are worth exploring.

“… DB: The first album was a really fresh, wonderful time. We’d spent then years growing up, being in bands, trying to be successful. When we gave up trying, everything seemed to happen. And I remember us wanting to introduce the band to public through the ‘City Sickness’ video – not making a traditional video trying to impress people at MTV, but having little story, and a natural feel to it.

SS: The song is still very special to me. I wrote it in St Ives – I’d taken a train there to escape London, to try and sort my head out – and I’ve been back there since, gone back to that spot, and could remember that exact moment. It was something felt at that time, and needed to say. And that relationship with Martin [Wallace, their video director] is still so strong. That visual sense has always been so important to us. And this video, with David ending up being right at centre of it….I was a bystander, with Syd in that video as a baby [Stuart’s eldest daughter, now 20]. There were some hairy moments with David pushing her through Soho late at night, getting severe looks from people! But whenever I think of this song now…we’d just made first album, we were on a real high. Full of pure joy.”

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